Media Analysis

A New Hope? Rouhani Press Reforms Usher in Optimism

Hassan Rouhani’s election ushered in a new era of hope for expanding Iran’s press freedoms. News of the reinstatement of the publications Eqbal and Tose’e, and transformations to the government’s official newspaper Iran Newspaper have fueled this optimism. Iran saw similar relaxations in press freedoms during the reformist era under President Khatami; however, these reforms were quickly overturned by conservative and religious elements within the county’s ruling establishment. While this possibility should not be ignored, reviewing recent actions such as the reopening of Eqbal and Tose’e as well as changes to Iran Newspaper give insight on changes to expect during Rouhani’s presidency.

Cartoon Roundup: August 25

In this week's Cartoon Roundup: commentary on slow Internet, Iran's bank situation,a tribute to former Prime Minister Mosaddegh, and more...

Campaign Controversy: Women Deemed "Un-Islamic" in Photos, Leads to Disqualifications

City council elections differed significantly from the national elections in that an unprecedented number of female candidates participated, igniting a firestorm of debate about the public depiction of their appearance in campaign materials.

Cartoon Roundup: August 12th

This week's cartoon roundup focuses on Journalist day in Iran and Ahmadinejad's departure from office.

Iranian Sunnis responsible for successful social media movement against Irancell

Iranian Sunnis extracted a formal apology from Iran’s second largest mobile service provider Irancell for a religiously offensive quiz question sent to subscribers.Following the release of the quiz, Sunni activists launched a media campaign on social media outlets such as Balatarin and Facebook to boycott Irancell, which led to a formal apology from the largely state-run company and becoming one of Iran’s most successful social media movements in recent history.

Facing Boundaries, Finding Freedom: An In-Depth Report on Iranian Journalists Working in Iran

Despite extensive documentation of and attention to direct state pressure on journalists and the almost continual reissuing of “red lines” as a pretense for these media-repressive tactics, little systematic research has been done about the field of journalism in Iran. There is a need to look “beyond the prison cell” and to examine more closely the everyday operating conditions in which Iranian journalists work, as well as their professional ethics and standards, in order to illustrate a fuller picture of the dynamics of Iran’s media culture. With this report, the Annenberg School for Communication’s Iran Media Program offers—to our knowledge—the first systematic evidence of the working environment of Iranian journalists.

Cartoon Roundup July 28th

Recent cartoons commented on Britain's royal baby, satellite TV, Internet speeds, and gay marriage.

Iranian Media reflects Iran’s Foreign Policy: Not clear on its stance towards Morsi’s ouster

ASL19 and the Iran Media Program analyze Iranian media coverage of the collapse of Morsi's government. While Iran’s initial response to the events was negative, Iran’s media ecosystem has seemingly diverged from its norms of party journalism, and has included a sometimes unintuitive range of perspectives on the situation.

Cartoon Roundup: July 16th

Cartoons circulating on Iranian cyberspace focused on the economic situation, broadcast censorship, and world news including the protests in Egypt and US phone surveillance.

Cartoon Roundup July 2nd

This week's cartoon roundup focuses on hopes for Rouhani's presidency, the departure of Ahmadinejad, and the economic situation in Iran.